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Author Topic : Co-ownership contract
 Everdale Goldens
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10/21/2013 9:12:07 AM reply with quote send message to Everdale Goldens Object to Post  

I would love some advice/suggestions/input on co-ownership contracts. I have never really had a formal contract with any of my dogs so this is a first for me and I really want to make sure it is done right. I know co-ownerships can be a sticky situation so I definitely want to have everything in writing. The dog is co-owned with the breeder who wants to show the dog. The dog is already a GCH, I finished championship & grand championship. Up until now everything has pretty much just been by mouth and I think all of the details really need to be put in writing. This dog means the world to me and I want to make sure I cover all of my bases. I would really appreciate any advice or suggestions. Thank you! happy :)
 GaylanStudio9
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10/21/2013 10:42:46 AM reply with quote send message to GaylanStudio9 Object to Post

My advice - do get it in writing!

I have limited experience with co-ownerships but that experience left me saying never again.

Verbal exchanges can change over time. Memory of exactly what was said may differ and perception of meaning may differ.

I'd also include cancellation terms. What happens when the dog gets older and who makes the decisions and pays the bills.

 Acclamation
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10/21/2013 12:01:32 PM reply with quote send message to Acclamation Object to Post

Must get it in writing! Mine are centered around what to do if you can no longer take care of an intact dog and who actually owns and controls the reproductive organs. In my co-ownerships, the owners are the sole custodians of the dogs including all their costs for health, maintenance, show expenses and classes for sports they may want to participate in. Only the reproductive tract is actually owned by the breeder with any expenses associated with that carried by the breeder. Every breeder's idea of co-ownership is different and the AKC and CKC can't mediate any potential disputes without a written contract.
 Everdale Goldens
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10/21/2013 12:35:21 PM reply with quote send message to Everdale Goldens Object to Post

Thank you both very much for your advice! I totally agree with everything you both said. This is the first dog I have co-owned and I'm thinking I won't do it again. wink :)

Definitely need to get something in writing! Anyone have any examples of a co-ownership contract or any advice on the steps to get started? This is all new territory for me so I really appreciate any and all advice and suggestions. Thanks!
 Zahir
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10/21/2013 7:32:38 PM reply with quote send message to Zahir Object to Post

I have (and still do) co-own a few dogs. I've only had two contracts. One, the dog was co-owned until he was paid for, at which time he was signed over to me. The other, the dog was co-owned until he was finished, at which time he was to be signed over to me. The breeder was entitled to one breeding to him at the breeder's expense. The breeder is no longer breeding, was horrible at getting paperwork back to me and so we technically still co-own that dog. The other dogs I co-owned there were no written contracts. One, I was given a bitch puppy, if she turned out, great if not, she would be a pet. I could breed her to whomever I wanted. The breeder just wanted to still be listed as an owner. I did not expect them to pay any expenses as far as showing, vet care, breeding etc. The dog I co-own and co-bred that lives with me I would not expect the other owner / breeder to pay any medical expenses, although I would and have contributed towards the vet expenses of dogs I have owned with the breeder that lived at her house. The non-verbal contracts were really just discussed during the consideration of whether or not to co-own, what we each expected out of it, and if we both agreed then great, we went ahead with the co-ownership. I know that is a risky way to do it. Co-ownerships ARE risky, and I have heard they can ruin friendships, regardless of whether or not there is a contract. I have a GREAT friend I wouldn't co-own with just because I worry I wouldn't live up to her expectations and I wouldn't want to strain our relationship wink ;)
 Cornus
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10/22/2013 8:15:00 AM reply with quote send message to Cornus Object to Post

I have done a few co-ownerships and have observed many that have been great and some that have been horrible. Here is my advice.

1) Spell out in writing who pays for each expense: showing, caring, feeding, health certifications.
2) Make sure you agree on feeding choices, vaccinations, veterinary care.
3) For males who owns the breeding rights. Who approves bitches for the dog to be bred to. is the stud fee divided. Who owns any frozen semen on the dog.
4) For females who owns the breeding rights. Is it one litter to the breeder and the rest are yours? Or do you get all the breedings. One very important thing that I just observed a friend go through. Put an age limit on the litter to the breeder. The breeder took so long to decide on a stud for the litter, that the bitch is probably too old to have a second litter.
5) For puppies born from co-owned dogs who gets first, second pick.

Basically include anything you can think of. Also don't be afraid to revisit the contract as the co-ownership progresses. Things may changes and items need to be revised.
 Everdale Goldens
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10/22/2013 2:53:43 PM reply with quote send message to Everdale Goldens Object to Post

Thank you very much for the advice. Definitely will include those things you mentioned. I don't want to forget anything important! I would be interested in hearing more advice and suggestions on the breeding aspect of co-owning male dogs. Also is there ever a time that the breeder will sign off the dog or is this rare with a male dog because of the breeding aspect?

Also would love to see an example contract and I need advice on simply how to start. Thanks again!
 Boksu
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10/24/2013 4:01:30 AM reply with quote send message to Boksu Object to Post

this post has been edited 1 time(s)

There's some good suggestions above, but it's also common here to have a certain age listed on a bitches contract, by what age should the breeder breed the bitch. If no breeding is done, after certain age the whole ownership is transferred to you. It may not be necessary, but sometimes it's good to have. With males it doesn't matter so much.

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Last edited by Boksu on 10/24/2013 4:03:10 AM
 Everdale Goldens
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10/24/2013 4:48:24 PM reply with quote send message to Everdale Goldens Object to Post

Yes thank you that is a good suggestion especially for bitches. This is a male that I am talking about.
 Acclamation
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10/24/2013 8:07:13 PM reply with quote send message to Acclamation Object to Post

Even with the boys, with collection options there is no need to keep the boys intact and not transfer ownership once the dog is neutered. In these cases, it would be necessary to spell out the ownership of the semen rather than the dog.
 Dandy Dandies
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10/24/2013 11:41:56 PM reply with quote send message to Dandy Dandies Object to Post

With bitches, ownership generally gets switched over the minute the bitch is spayed as with the dogs when they are neutered.
 Everdale Goldens
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10/28/2013 9:23:35 AM reply with quote send message to Everdale Goldens Object to Post

Thank you. happy :)

Any specific advice on getting started or any examples people are willing to share?? happy :)

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Did you know?
The figure 8 exercise requires the team to heel in a figure 8 pattern either on or off leash. Generally two of the ring stewards will assist the judge with this exercise by acting as "posts", standing 8 feet apart, that the team walks around to form the loops of the figure 8.
Did you know?
Judges are generally certified to judge one or several breeds, usually in the same group, but a few "all-breed" judges have the training and experience to judge large numbers of breeds.