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Author Topic : What is your secret in keeping white coats, white?
 SoSunnyful
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3/26/2013 3:58:11 AM reply with quote send message to SoSunnyful Object to Post   

I was just wondering how the heck do exhibitors of white coated breed keep the white coat from yellowing? I have a cavalier so I would just focus the techniques to the white parts of the coat, but any advice is welcome laugh :D
 Dream Castle Kennels
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3/26/2013 11:52:52 AM reply with quote send message to Dream Castle Kennels Object to Post

this post has been edited 1 time(s)

My aunt used a powder on her show dogs just before a show.Not sure what kind it is,but it really works!I'm sure one of our other SD players know what it is I am talking about.
* edited due to typo *
 Inspirational Kennels
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3/26/2013 12:16:21 PM reply with quote send message to Inspirational Kennels Object to Post

We breed/show Cavs and they do not live in kennels, so they do get yellow, especially on the feet. We use a whitening spray that morning, then brush it out right before we go into the ring. It works really well, although it does not smell very pleasant lol (Not horrible, just not pleasing)

There are several different types of whitening spray, but the one we use is called White Ice. We bought it at a dog show, but I'm sure you can order it online, and they may have it at some pet stores.

~Shimmer
 Cloudpointe Kennels
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3/26/2013 2:06:51 PM reply with quote send message to Cloudpointe Kennels Object to Post

You can use anything from whitening shampoos to grooming powders and sprays. I suggest first bathing in with a whitening shampoo (really scrub it into the coat) then before you go into the ring, put colestral (you can buy it at most grooming vendors or 3cs dog supplies website) and put a whitening powder on, let it sit for a little while then either brush it out or blow dry it out with a high power drier and finish off with a hair spray (I use thick n thicker or super hold) and brush it to look how you want. I've worked with many professional handlers and this is how every one taught me to groom the white dogs.

PM me if you would like to know more happy :)
 SoSunnyful
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3/27/2013 2:51:24 AM reply with quote send message to SoSunnyful Object to Post

Thanks for sharing! Think I'll experiment with these ideas during her next bath. laugh :D

But I do have a question for Cloudpointe: I just googled colestral, colestral whitening, and whole other variations of it but I can't find the product. Can you send me a link of one or be more specific?

Thank you!
 Cornus
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3/27/2013 8:42:24 AM reply with quote send message to Cornus Object to Post

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I show a Border Colllie in conformation that also works sheep on the farm every day.

To keep him white first we started with good coat genetics. He has a great coat and texture that credt to his breeder.

Next he gets brushed out once a week. This gets the dried dirt and farm bits out. I also keep his feet and hocks trimmed so they have less of a chance of collecting particles.

Before a show the white parts get bathed in a whitening shampoo. I always follow this will Chris Christianson After Bath. Need to close the cutucles so no more dirt gets in.

At a show I use Corn Starch to powder the legs.
 delti
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3/27/2013 9:17:44 AM reply with quote send message to delti Object to Post

As others have said, a good whitening shampoo. I like Sho Sno but recently switched to Kelco's Plum White for the milder properties (no harsh chemicals) and it works great.

Don't bother with the colestral/chalk combo (I think the two main brands are Chris Christensen Colestral and Wella Kolestral)except on the day of the show. If you leave it in for more than a day or two, it will supposedly dry out the coat.
 Cloudpointe Kennels
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3/27/2013 7:52:58 PM reply with quote send message to Cloudpointe Kennels Object to Post

Here is colestral

www.3cdog.com/product_info.php?cPath=21_76&products_id=3042

As said above only do the chalk and colestral before ring time
 Acclamation
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3/27/2013 8:27:45 PM reply with quote send message to Acclamation Object to Post

I always find the Kolestral makes my furnishings "limp" and makes the chalk clump. I'm thinking I just don't do it right sad :(. I use CC White on White shampoo and let it sit for at least 5 mins before rinsing. About an hour before showing I use some Bodifier or CC Thick and Thicker mouse (dry it) then lightly chalk, comb through and blow it out again.
 .envoy.
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3/27/2013 11:30:23 PM reply with quote send message to .envoy. Object to Post

As long as you take a slicker to the furnishings after you kolestral it, THEN apply the chalk, it shouldn't clump happy :) Just make sure you really get all the hair with the slicker
 SoSunnyful
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3/27/2013 11:56:45 PM reply with quote send message to SoSunnyful Object to Post

Wow! Look at all these replies! I love you guys happy :)
I definitely will try all of these out, except for the colestral - it'll have to wait till May Showing wink ;).
 .envoy.
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3/27/2013 11:59:16 PM reply with quote send message to .envoy. Object to Post

I'd try using the kolestral before showing just to make sure you can get it to look how you want it to. happy :)
 Shutterfox
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3/28/2013 7:49:53 AM reply with quote send message to Shutterfox Object to Post

QUICSILVER!!! It's for horses, but it does WONDERS on white coats of dogs too. You can find it at antytack shop. Whatever whitening shampoo you use, make sure it is dark purple in color. I have been showing horses for years and recently started showing dogs and I will not use anything else on their whites. You NEED a purple shampoo to get those whites super clean and bright. It won't make any other colors dingy too, so if you're dog is multicolored, it won't affect the other colors.

I swear by QuicSilver. I don't buy into the overpriced dog grooming products. The horse grooming products are just as good, if not better, for a fraction of the price for the amount of product in the bottle. Also in the tack store, you can find green spot remover, which also works to remove yellowing areas on the hair.

For qeuick touch ups, I have a secret recipe: in a spray bottle, mix about one to two tablespoons of the purple shampoo(again, I prefer QuicSilver) and fill the rest of the bottle with rubbing alcohol. Shake well, the soap won't bubble or foam up because of the alcohol. Spray on and rub in. Even if you're in a hurry and don't have the shampoo, vigorously rub in some rubbing alcohol and that will remove the majority of the stains.

I'm speaking from years of experience as a horse groom for international competitors, and I've recently started showing dogs. Good luck!!
 tomcat1
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3/28/2013 10:10:40 AM reply with quote send message to tomcat1 Object to Post

I was going to come and say purple horse shampoo! Its designed to remove pee and grass stains from horses- it works on dogs happy :)
 Dream Castle Kennels
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3/28/2013 12:14:38 PM reply with quote send message to Dream Castle Kennels Object to Post

Quick silver is amazing stuff!I used it not only on my light colored horses,but goats,and even my rottweiler I had growing up.(works great on black coats too,obviously)
 Inspirational Kennels
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3/28/2013 1:18:32 PM reply with quote send message to Inspirational Kennels Object to Post

Now that we're on horse products, maybe I should mention this...

I dilute Wisk(detergent) and rub it allllll over the white on my horse(s), leave it on for 2-3 minutes, then rinse it off WELL. It is fantastic. I used to have a Black Tobiano Gyspy Vanner who was mostly white, and his white was flawless after using this.

I have no idea if you can use this on dogs or not, but it works wonders on horses so I thought I'd mention it...

~Shimmer
 Acclamation
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3/29/2013 1:07:31 AM reply with quote send message to Acclamation Object to Post

OMG!! Totally forgot about Quiksilver ... what a fantastic idea! Got out of show horses and into show dogs about 8 years ago and completely spaced out of it sad :(. The funny thing is, after reading this, I went down to my old tack trunk in the basement and I actually still have some happy :) I'm definitely going to give this a try
 Cornus
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3/29/2013 7:28:28 AM reply with quote send message to Cornus Object to Post

If your furnishing are limp after cholesteral and chalking you are probably using too much cholesteral/chalk mate. I find with these less is definetely more. Make sure you practice at home before a show to get the correct ammount.

Also after chalking/powdering be sure to let it sit on the dog for at least half an hour. An hour is better. Then brush out with a slicker. After this I blow out the remaining chalk with my forced air dryer.
 SoSunnyful
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4/2/2013 3:36:30 AM reply with quote send message to SoSunnyful Object to Post

laugh :D
Thank you for all of the advice! I will definitely practice using all of these before the show!
 samshine
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4/2/2013 6:09:07 PM reply with quote send message to samshine Object to Post

Word of caution on the Quicksilver. Do NOT use it on a Samoyed coat!! I tried it on the recommendation of a Springer Spaniel person and my dog had a definite blue/green tinge.

I imagine it would be okay on a Cavalier coat since it seems to be similar to a springer's in texture, but coats like Samoyeds are more porous and will absorb things that other coats won't.

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In multi-breed and all-breed shows, the winners of all breeds within the kennel club's breed Groups then compete for Group placements.